The Colors of Gender Thanks to Modern Marketing and Ancient Ancestors

From the day you were born, even before conception, there are beliefs and stereotypes that are attached to gender.

Let’s consider the color continuum for gender. Pink is for girls and blue is for boys. Right? Where did this begin? Who decided which colors belong to which gender?

Here is a brief trip through history. In the 1800’s all babies, male and female, wore white “dresses” in infancy. Thus, babies were gender neutral. These sacks were easy for changing diapers and to bleach when they became dirty.

Then around the 1920’s Western parents began dressing the little ones in colors. Pink was associated with boys. Yes, you heard me, boys. Here is the rationale: red is a bold and brave color and too strong for children so, boys got the watered-down version…pink.

Blue, a more subdued color was for girls. And by the way, blue was associated with the Virgin Mary, thus a color of purity. Just saying!

Can Men Support Women At Work

I have found LinkedIn to be a magical place to connect with some of the smartest and most pioneering individuals on the planet.

Recently Ed Gurowitz, Senior Consultant at Gender Allies contacted me after seeing some of my blogs about GUTSY WOMEN LEADERS.

He sent me an important post about how to create gender relationships at work. I want to thank him for reaching out and here is some of his great advice.

8 Steps to Co-creating Gender Partnership at Work

When Patterns Of The Past Show Up In The Present

I just finished reading a speech Vice President Joe Biden gave at Yale University.

It brought tears to my eyes and I was compelled to read it again. This time I grabbed the tissue box, stopped what I was doing and sat wiping freely flowing tears away and sat looking out at the fully blossomed spring trees.

Thunder was in the air and I imagined all the preparations for Beau’s funeral, all the expected things that have to be done. I thought about the widow and the children.

The thunder intensified.

Losing his wife and daughter in a terrible car accident decades ago should be enough. Now his son Beau to brain cancer. And yet he is the model of a jovial, gentle natured man with such love for his wife Jill, children and grandchildren and the importance of family first.

I have often thought that he would be, as the Native Americans say “good medicine” for President Obama who did not have the presence of his own father in his life.

And as I sat thinking about tragedies I began to ruminate about the sudden death of my father from a heart attack when I was fourteen.

RUMINATE